If unit testing is the cake, functional testing is just the icing

I’ve heard a lot of different view points on software testing over the years. Especially when it comes to unit testing. Some people swear by it and treat code coverage metrics like it’s their greatest achievement in life (maybe it is). Others think it’s an unnecessary burden. I’ve heard arguments like “how can you refactor code if you have to update all of your tests each time” and “how can you refactor code if you don’t have sufficient unit test coverage” or “you’re flying by the seat of your pants without good coverage” vs “your tests are just a burden, you’re slowing me down!”.

I’d like to give a view from the trenches as it were. Albeit a view my trench working on a REST web service.

Some background

Before I begin I’d like to clarify what I mean by “unit test” and “functional test”.

  1. Unit testing – This is breaking down the application code into individual units that can be tested in isolation at a code level.
  2. Functional testing – This is more of a higher level, black-box test (normally from a user point of view) where the test doesn’t care about how the application functions. In this context functional are REST API calls simulating user behaviours and flows.

Over the past 18 months we’ve tried to balance our approach to testing. To do this we have taken the view that the end user is the most important piece of the puzzle. So we should focus our testing efforts on user scenarios. This means more functional tests, and less focus on unit testing.

The problem

For quite a while this approach worked well. We have suits of functional tests that make REST API calls to our web service and check the responses coming back. The tests walk through specific scenarios (creating user accounts, configuring the state of user accounts, testing scenarios with these accounts etc) and assert that the system behaves as expected. If something breaks (like you change the location of a field, or something that was an integer in the response is now a string, then the test fails, or a field is removed from the response.

Fast forward 18 months. We now have several hundred of these tests. They run every time code in the “dev” branch is updated (for us that means every time a feature branch is merged in and the code is pushed to our test environment). “That’s good right?” Well, here are some down-sides we’ve seen

  1. Tests are slow! – These kind of functional tests aren’t quick to execute, they are testing real systems with complex logic behind them.
  2. They are dependent on things I don’t care about – Should I really care if our user account team has a server down in our test environment? Should it block my work? What if the storage platform is down? In this instance if my test can’t create a user account then it fails and I have to investigate why.
  3. They test my colleagues work – Remember when I said these tests run every time code is merged in from feature branches. That means that not only are these codes testing my work, but they are testing other peoples work too. If I’m testing that value A = B and someone else is working on a feature where A = B+C then we have a race to see who gets there first with both code changes and test changes (granted this could be avoided by managing the work but it’s not always so simple in the real world).
  4. They are slow! – I’ve said it twice because it’s important. When testing changes I want to be confident that my changes work as expected, but I also want to be sure that I haven’t broken anything. Functional tests often run late in the development process (they need to run on a test environment after the code is built & deployed) which means you get feedback late too. If you did break something, finding out at this stage normally means you’ve broken your service / app for someone else in the testing environment.

The solution

I honestly think that both unit testing and functional testing have their place in web app development. It’s critical to test your application from the inside (via unit tests) and the outside (via functional tests). After all, your users are the most important thing so you have to test that they get the behaviour they expect.

However, a lot of people ignore unit testing, or at least treat it like second class citizen. Maybe it’s because they associate it with TDD or other approaches they dislike. Maybe it’s a lack of knowledge of how to write testable code (dependency injection, inversion of control, TDD all help with this).

Personally, I think that unit testing should be the primary focus of your testing efforts. Why?

  1. Unit tests are fast (well, if written properly) – Yes, it’s possible to write slow unit tests, but, if you’re breaking your code down into small individual units and writing testable code in the first place, then the tests should be quick to execute.
  2. Feedback is isolated- Unit tests run against my local changes. So if a test breaks I know it’s almost certainly because I’ve broken something and I need to fix it. No need to go on a wild goose chase only to find out its someone else’s change.
  3. You can refacor with confidence – I can look at code coverage reports and other metrics and assess if the code I’m going to refactor has test coverage and then make changes with a higher degree of confidence. If something breaks I get feedback straight away.
  4. They enforce good patterns and practices – Just like it’s possible to write a slow test, it’s also possible to write a monolithic test to test monolithic code. Unit testing makes you think about how you’re going to test your code (like how can I test what happens if dependency X throws an exception). Unit testing nudges you towards practices like dependency injection, inversion of control (etc) all of which makes code easier to maintain and understand. Everyone wins.

Having a solid set of unit tests means you catch issues early and can refactor with confidence, leaving the functional tests there as a safety net rather than first line of defence. Like I said in the title, unit tests should really be the cake, and functional tests are just the icing.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Please enter your name, email and a comment.